Domestic and Sexual Abuse, Violence against Women and Girls

 

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Domestic Violence and Abuse 

Domestic violence and abuse is any incident or pattern of incidents of controlling, coercive or threatening behaviour, violence or abuse between those aged 16 or over who are or have been intimate partners or family members regardless of gender or sexuality.  This can encompass, but is not limited to, the following types of abuse:

psychological

physical

sexual

financial or

emotional

Controlling behaviour is defined as: a range of acts designed to make a person subordinate and/or dependent by isolating them from sources of support, exploiting their resources and capacities for personal gain, depriving them of the means needed for independence, resistance and escape and regulating their everyday behaviour.

Coercive behaviour is defined as: an act or a pattern of acts of assault, threats, humiliation and intimidation or other abuse that is used to harm, punish, or frighten their victim.

Domestic violence can happen to anyone abuse regardless of age, race, income, religion, belief, sex, disability, culture or sexual orientation.

You are not alone. Help and support is available please follow this link

If this is happening to you, there are things you can do to help keep yourself safe click here to find out how. 

For help & advice regarding MARAC please click here.

Sexual Violence 
 
Sexual violence is any behaviour or act of a sexual nature which is unwanted and takes place without consent or understanding. This includes but is not restricted to: rape, sexual assault, sexual abuse, sexual harassment, rape within marriage/relationships, forced marriage, female genital mutilation, so-called honour-based violence, trafficking and sexual exploitation
 
Sexual violence can happen to anyone abuse regardless of age, race, income, religion, belief, sex, disability, culture or sexual orientation.
 
The person who commits the assault is always to blame for making the choice to commit assault. 
 
You are not alone. Help and support is available please follow this link
 
If this is happening to you, there are things you can do to help keep yourself safe click here to find out how. 
 
 
Female Genital Mutilation 
 
Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) comprises all procedures involving partial or total removal of the external female genitalia or other injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reason. 
 
The Female Genital Mutilation Act was introduced in 2003 and came into effect in March 2004.
 
The Act:
Makes it illegal to practice FGM in the UK;
Makes it illegal to take girls who are British nationals or permanent residents of the UK abroad for FGM whether or not it is lawful in that country;
Makes it illegal to aid, abet, counsel or procure the carrying out of FGM abroad;
Has a penalty of up to 14 years in prison and/or a fine.
 
FGM is a type of harmful practice. These are forms of violence and abuse which have been committed primarily against women and girls in certain communities and societies for so long that they are considered, or presented by perpetrators, as part of accepted cultural practice. 
 
You are not alone. Help and support is available please follow this link.
 
If this is happening to you, there are things you can do to help keep yourself safe. Click here to find out how.
 
 
Forced Marriage 
 
A Forced Marriage is where one or both people do not (or in cases of people with learning disabilities, or under a certain age, cannot) consent to the marriage and pressure or abuse is used. The pressure put on people to marry against their will can be physical (including threats, physical violence and sexual violence) or emotional and psychological (for example, when someone is made to feel like they’re bringing shame on their family). Financial abuse (taking wages or not giving someone any money) can also be a factor.
 
It is important not to confuse ‘forced’ marriage with ‘arranged’ marriage. An arranged marriage is when the families are involved in helping to choose the marriage partner, but it is the choice of both the bride and groom whether they want to get married or not. A forced marriage is when they have no choice or feel that they have no choice.  Forced Marriage is a type of harmful practice. These are forms of violence and abuse which have been committed primarily against women and girls in certain communities and societies for so long that they are considered, or presented by perpetrators, as part of accepted cultural practice.
 
You are not alone. Help and support is available please follow this link.
 
If this is happening to you, there are things you can do to help keep yourself safe. Click here to find out how.
 
 
So-called ‘Honour’ based violence 
 
So-called ‘Honour’-Based Violence (HBV) is a violent crime or incident which may have been committed to protect or defend the honour of the family or community. It is often linked to family members or acquaintances who mistakenly believe someone has brought shame to their family or community by doing something that is not in keeping with the traditional beliefs of their culture.
 
So-called honour based violence can exist in any culture. Most victims are women but men can also be victims. It is important to understand that this is not a crime which is only committed by men; sometimes female relatives will support, incite or assist. It is also not unusual for younger relatives to be selected to undertake the abuse as a way to protect senior members of the family. So-called honour based violence is against the law and support is available to help you keep safe.
 
HBV is a type of harmful practice. These are forms of violence and abuse which have been committed primarily against women and girls in certain communities and societies for so long that they are considered, or presented by perpetrators, as part of accepted cultural practice.
 
You are not alone. Help and support is available please follow this link
 
If this is happening to you, there are things you can do to help keep yourself safe. Click here to find out how.
 
 
Sexual Harassment 
 
When someone calls you insulting sexual names, talks about you in a sexual way that makes you feel uncomfortable (like commenting on your body), or spreads sexual rumours about you, this is known as sexual harassment. This could happen in person, over the phone, or online.
 
If someone intentionally grabs or touches you in a sexual way that you do not like, or you’re forced to kiss someone or do something else sexual against your will, this is classed as sexual assault. This includes sexual touching of any part of someone’s body, and it makes no difference whether you are clothed or not.
 
You are not alone. Help and support is available please follow this link
 
If this is happening to you, there are things you can do to help keep yourself safe. Click here to find out how.
 
Stalking
 
Stalking can take place in many forms in the workplace. Some stalkers are colleagues or clients of the victim, others are individuals who are unrelated to the workplace but who make contact with the victim there because of ease of access or to cause them further distress. 
 
Stalking can consist as any type of behaviour including: nuisance telephone calls, sending excessive emails, being followed, sending gifts or letters, death threats, making false complaints to employers/police or other officials, abuse of and through social networking sites, visiting home/place of work, blackmail, physical and sexual assault. If the behaviour is persistent and clearly unwanted causing fear, harassment or anxiety then it is stalking.
 
You are not alone. Help and support is available please follow this link.
 
If this is happening to you, there are things you can do to help keep yourself safe. Click here to find out how.
 
   
 

 


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